Testosterone Injections

Testosterone Injections

Testosterone pills and testosterone gels and creams are wider accepted methods of supplementing the hormone in the female body when there is a deficiency. However, another valid method that many women overlook is testosterone injections.

Continue reading to learn all about testosterone injections, including what they are, their benefits, how and when they are administered, and more.

What are Testosterone Injections?

What are testosterone injections

Testosterone injections are shots made up of synthetically produced testosterone. They are administered to women whose bodies do not produce enough of the hormone.

When Could the Use of Testosterone Injections Help?

Without a doubt, there is limited evidence supporting the use and long-term safety of testosterone in premenopausal women. However, testosterone injections and other testosterone medications are used in young women to improve mood, libido, and overall well-being.

In postmenopausal women, injectable testosterone is used in those who are taking estrogen therapy and have decreased sex drive with no identifiable cause. Research studies show that appropriate doses of testosterone enanthate for six months in those who are testosterone deficient recover libido and lean muscle mass as well.

Common Testosterone Injections

Testosterone enanthate or testosterone cypionate are commonly used intramuscularly for postmenopausal women during androgen replacement therapy.

The infamous test 400 is commonly used among men body builders and is not recommended for women. It is a 400 mg/mL blend of testosterone propionate, testosterone cypionate, and testosterone enanthate. 

Testosterone Injections Benefits

Benefits of testosterone injections

In general, injectable testosterone is administered to treat hormonal conditions and manage their symptoms. These symptoms include:

  • Fatigue
  • Lack of well-being
  • Low libido
  • Unexplainable fatigue
  • Anxiety
  • Diminished sexual arousal
  • Insomnia
  • Headaches
  • Loss of muscle mass
  • Depressed moods
  • And many more

Testosterone injections seem to have a more beneficial effect on brain function and memory enhancement in comparison to topical forms.

How and When to Take Them

Using testosterone injections

How to Take a Testosterone Shot

Testosterone shots are intramuscular, meaning that they are injected directly into a muscle by a doctor.

When to Use a Testosterone Shot

For androgen deficiency, testosterone injections are normally injected every two to four weeks at doses of 25 to 100 mg. However, 50 to 100 mg of testosterone enanthate or testosterone cypionate every four to six weeks has also been used successfully.

The exact treatment schedule will depend upon your need for the injection as well as symptom relief throughout the months. Doses of 100 mg should never be the starting dose. Also, the use of these anabolic steroids should be limited to four months before their continued usage is reconsidered.

Testosterone Injections Side Effects

Testosterone injections side effects

It is important to advise your doctor if you have any of the following medical conditions before treatment: androgen-dependent neoplasias, severe acne, hirsutism, or alopecia.

Some common side effects include pain and swelling at the injection site, breast swelling, hirsutism, acne, changed libido, headaches, or anxiety.

Less common, yet more serious side effects may evolve if women have been taking testosterone for too long, such as male characteristics - like voice deepening and frontal hair loss - as well as menstrual cycle changes or an enlarged clitoris.

For specific use, testosterone injections are not often recommended during pregnancy due to the possible risk of fetal harm. After birth, the drug may pass into breast milk when lactating as well.  
Keep in mind that aforementioned side effects generally reverse with discontinuation of treatment.

Where Do I Buy Testosterone Injections?

Testosterone shots can safely be acquired with a doctor's prescription. For proper usage, only allow a registered healthcare professional to administer the injectable testosterone into the muscle.

Key Takeaways

All in all, testosterone injections can be used for many of the same reasons as other testosterone treatments; however, they are more commonly administered to postmenopausal women who have a noticeable decrease in sexual desire and muscle mass. These shots are administered into muscles on a rotating schedule. Mild side effects include pain and swelling at the injection site, headaches, anxiety, and breast swelling. Injectable testosterone is not recommended for use during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Always use testosterone injections under the supervision of a doctor for best results.

However, to avoid the possibility of severe health consequences with pharmaceuticals, continue reading to learn more about natural testosterone supplements and boosters.

Bibliography

  • Bolour, S. & Braunstein, G. (2005). Testosterone therapy in women: a review. International Journal of Impotence Research, 17(5), 399-408. Retrieved August 27, 2018, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15889125
  • Glaser, R. & Dimitrakakis, C. (2013). Testosterone therapy in women: Myths and misconceptions. Maturitas, 74(3), 230-234. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2013.01.003
  • Harvard Health Publishing. (2013). Testosterone therapy: Is it for women? Retrieved August 24, 2018, from https://www.health.harvard.edu/womens-health/testosterone-therapy-is-it-for-women
  • Kalantaridou, S.N. & Calis, K.A. (2006). Testosterone therapy in premenopausal women. Seminars in Reproductive Medicine, 24(2), 106-114. Retrieved August 24, 2018, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16633984
  • Maclaran, K. & Panay, N. (2012). The safety of postmenopausal testosterone therapy. Women's Health, 8(3), 263-275. doi: 10.2217/WHE.12.11
  • Mayo Clinic. (2016). Testosterone therapy in women: Does it boost sex drive? Retrieved August 24, 2018, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menopause/expert-answers/testosterone-therapy/faq-20057935
  • Morley, J.E. & Perry, H.M. (2003). Androgens and Women at the Menopause and Beyond. The Journals of Gerontology, 58(5), M409-M416. doi: 10.1093/gerona/58.5.M409
  • The North American Menopause Society. (2013). Not in the Mood but Want to Be? New Studies Bring Women Hope. Retrieved August 24, 2018, from https://www.menopause.org/docs/default-source/2013/testosteron-flibanserin-mg-ep-incorp-quote-pa.pdf