Natural Testosterone Supplements & Boosters

Natural testosterone supplements and boosters

Although implementing a testosterone diet may give women a leg up in their pursuit of hormonal balance, they may feel as if they need a way to hasten results. This is where natural testosterone supplements and boosters step in, which work by either indirectly or directly increasing testosterone levels in women.

Continue reading to learn more about natural testosterone supplements and boosters to be on your way to a hormonally balanced life that is free of dreaded symptoms.

Testosterone Vitamins & Minerals

Testosterone vitamins and minerals
  • Magnesium. Magnesium - the age-old remedy for stress - also works as a natural testosterone booster by aiding in the manufacturing of steroid hormones. Because cholesterol - the precursor to progesterone, estrogens, and testosterone - cannot be synthesized without magnesium, the mineral is necessary for healthy androgen levels.

  • Vitamin C (ascorbic acid). Low levels of ascorbic acid have been found to increase enzyme aromatase levels, which is responsible for converting testosterone into estrogen. This will result in high estrogen and low testosterone. To sustain healthy testosterone levels, load up on the necessary vitamin.

  • B-complex vitamins. The B-complex vitamins are acknowledged for their ability to help cope with stress and adrenal fatigue. As will be explained further, cortisol - the stress hormone - and testosterone have an inverse relationship. When one is high, the other is low. The three major B vitamins needed are B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenic acid), and B6 (pyridoxine).

Herbal Testosterone Options

Herbal testosterone supplements
  • Ashwagandha. This is an adaptogenic herb used in ancient Indian medicine. Because of its effects in reducing the stress hormone cortisol, it is believed to also increase testosterone levels simultaneously. Remember that high levels of cortisol can suppress free testosterone levels.

  • Chrysin. This bioflavonoid from the genus Passiflora works as an aromatase inhibitor in men and women, thus preventing the conversion of testosterone into estrogen. As such, it is a popular option among body builders as an herbal testosterone booster since it leaves more testosterone to influence muscle building.

  • Eurycoma longifolia. Also known as tongkat ali or “Malaysian ginseng,” this herbal medicinal plant increases the release rate of free testosterone from sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). In this way, this testosterone booster more so maintains the hormone's current level than increases it. As such, it is used to improve sex drive and well-being and reduce fatigue.

  • Tribulus terrestris. This botanical herb has been used for centuries to increase libido in women. Recent studies have proven its efficacy in enhancing free and bioavailable testosterone levels in postmenopausal women, thus treating hypoactive sexual desire disorder with few side effects.

Hormone-Regulating Supplements

  • Macafem. This hormone-regulating supplement works by stimulating the endocrine system to produce more of its own reproductive hormones, like testosterone. By encouraging natural hormone production, it can be considered one of the safest testosterone supplements on the market.

Women who are searching for hormonal balance should realize that supplements to increase testosterone may take a few months for them to start feeling the benefits. Dedicating time for the natural treatment regimen's effectiveness could be less of a burden compared to any possibly long-term financial and health risks associated with testosterone medications and products.

Key Takeaways

In sum, when used alongside a balanced testosterone diet, natural testosterone supplements may be the hidden key to overall hormonal balance. They include testosterone vitamins and minerals - of magnesium and vitamins B and C - in addition to herbal testosterone supplements - which include ashwagandha, chrysin, eurycoma longifolia, and tribulus terrestris - and hormone-regulating supplements, like Macafem.

By working with a certified healthcare professional to find out which fits best into your healthy lifestyle, relief is right around the corner.

Bibliography

  • Chandrasekhar, K. et al. (2012). A Prospective, Randomized Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Safety and Efficacy of a High-Concentration Full-Spectrum Extract of Ashwagandha Root in Reducing Stress and Anxiety in Adults. Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine, 34(3), 255-262. doi: 10.4103/0253-7176.106022
  • De Souza, K.Z. et al. (2016). Efficacy of Tribulus terrestris for the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in postmenopausal women: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Menopause, 23(11), 1252-1256. doi: 10.1097/GME.0000000000000766
  • Grimaldi, A.S. et al. (2013). 25(OH) Vitamin D is Associated with Greater Muscle Strength in Healthy Men and Women. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(1), 157-162. Doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e31826c9a78
  • Gunnels, T.A. et al. (2014). Increasing Circulating Testosterone: Impact of Herbal Dietary Supplements. Journal of Plant Biochemistry & Physiology, 2, 130. doi: 10.4172/2329-9029.1000130
  • Seelig, M.S. & Rosanoff, A. (2003). The Magnesium Factor. New York: Avery. Available from Google Books.
  • Shippen, E. & Fryer, W. (1998). The Testosterone Syndrome. New York: M. Evans and Company, Inc. Available from Google Books.
  • Talbott, S.M. et al. (2013). Effect of Tongkat Ali on stress hormones and psychological mood state in moderately stressed subjects. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 10, 28. doi: 10.1186/1550-2783-10-28